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gallifreyglo:

securelyinsecure:

Throwback - Celebrities Recreate Iconic Covers for Ebony Magazine’s 65th Anniversary (2010)

To celebrate its 65th anniversary issue and icons of the past and present, EBONY magazine asked their favorite entertainers to pose in modern-day recreations of those covers for a one-of-a-kind look back at the past.

Featuring: Regina King (as Eartha Kitt), Mary J. Blige (as Diana Ross), Nia Long (as Dorothy Dandridge), John Legend (as Duke Ellington), Lamman Rucker (as Richard Roundtree), Taraji P. Henson (as Diahann Carroll), Blair Underwood (as Sidney Poitier), Jurnee Smollett (as Lena Horne), Usher Raymond (as Sammy Davis, Jr.), and Samuel L. Jackson (as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.), among others.

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SHUT. THE. FUCK. UP. PIPER.

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uncutcolombiancoke:

70sbestblackalbums:

BLACK MUSIC ON SUNSET STRIP

Billboards used to be dope way back when.

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The Georgie Girl Campaign: Help Georgina Beyer Fight Kidney Disease

frank-e-shadow-tongue:

kumuhina:

During our recent tour of Aotearoa (New Zealand) with KUMU HINA, we had the privilege of spending time with Georgina Beyer and Annie Goldson (pictured below).

Georgina, the charismatic star of Annieʻs powerful 2002 documentary GEORGIE GIRL, is the world’s first openly transgender person to be elected to public office. Of Maori descent, Georgina is an example of a courageous individual who overcame adversity, marginalization and discrimination to become a positive force for change and an enduring symbol of hope and inspiration to people around the world. 

Georgina is currently suffering from end-stage chronic renal failure and Annie has created an online campaign to help cover the exorbitant costs of her medical treatment. 

Please see Annieʻs letter below to learn more about the campaign and an opportunity to see the film.

We hope youʻll join us in supporting and spreading the word about this effort.

Thank you for your attention and consideration,

Joe Wilson & Dean Hamer

KUMU HINA Producers/Directors

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Dear All,

Thanks so much to those of you who have donated to the Save Georgina Fund. As many of you will know, Georgina Beyer, the first transgender person to be elected into national office in the world, has renal failure and is having dialysis four times a day as she waits on the list for a kidney transplant.

We have made it over the $3,000 mark with another $1,000 from a fundraising screening we had along with Documentary Edge in Wellington. We’re still going: and for another month yet you can still stream GEORGIE GIRL free (or preferably in exchange for a donation).

To access the Save Georgina Fund: open www.op.co.nz, click on Give and follow the instructions ..

There is some relatively good news for Georgina and those facing renal disease. The Government is putting more money into the kidney donation process that could see more people accessing this life-saving operation.

In the meantime, by chance I met Hawaii based filmmakers Joe Wilson and Dean Hamer at the Wairoa Maori Film Festival. They were showing KUMU HINA, their documentary about a native Hawaiian transgender woman. The film follows Hina, who is an inspiring teacher working at an indigenous school in Hawaii.  The film also traces her rocky relationship with her relatively traditional Tongan husband.

By chance Joe and Dean were showing KUMU HINA in Wellington immediately before GEORGIE GIRL showed at DocEdge. A remarkable coincidence that the only two films in the world about politically influential Polynesian transgender women were showing in the same location on the same night!

What struck me upon watching these films back-to-back, was how these two transgender women, in their different ways, have gone through really difficult life paths, struggled against all sorts of odds, to reach a place where they could contribute to their respective societies in very powerful and important ways.

There is a generosity about them we don’t seen much. My understanding is that prior to Christianity being introduced, transgender males and females occupied significant and respected places within Polynesian culture and by hook or by crook, Georgina and Hina managed to find their way back. All power to them, as this has not be easy path for either of them.

Please circulate this amongst your lists …. and help Georgina Beyer continue to be an inspiration to us all.

Ng Mihi

Professor Annie Goldson

Auckland, NZ

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"People today don’t even know who Jesse Owens was. They don’t have no idea what happened in 1936 [at the Olympics in Berlin]. That’s what’s scary, because our history is being lost. The world should recognize how Owens transcended race. His life was so remarkable. And he came up during the time of no drugs, no steroids, none of that, yet his record [winning four gold medals in track and field in a single Olympics] stood all the way till Carl Lewis [who matched the performance at the 1984 Games]. He really put the U.S. in the forefront of the world for taking down the German empire. It’s funny, because when he got back to the United States after winning those four gold medals, there was a ticker-tape parade to the Waldorf-Astoria—and would you believe, they wouldn’t let him in the front door? He had to go in the service elevator. It’s very epic, very beautiful to play him and introduce him to a new generation."

Anthony Mackie, in an interview with Interview Magazine

The rest of the interview focuses more on Mackie’s role as Tupac Shakur in the upcoming Notorious, but his comments on Jesse Owens are spot-on. You can learn more about Owens and why he’s so important at the website run by the Jesse Owens Trust.

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marxvx:

If the Postal Service offered basic banking services - nothing fancy, just basic bill paying, check cashing and small dollar loans - then it could provide affordable financial services for underserved families, and, at the same time, shore up its own financial footing.

"Payday loans are advertised as loans that must be repaid with the borrower’s next paycheck," the OIG paper says. "However, most borrowers cannot afford to pay the loan back in full, so they renew their loan repeatedly and are in debt for an average of 5 months of the year, all while paying fees that typically equate to a 391 percent annual interest rate."

"Rather than giving borrowers the credit they need to climb out of a hole," the report notes, "these types of loans often dig borrowers deeper into debt." By contrast, postal banking would cost customers much less, increase their financial stability, and help them save. 

"With affordable financial offerings from the Postal Service, the underserved could collectively save billions of dollars in exorbitant fees and interest," the OIG says. "This could make a big difference to struggling families - on average, people who filed for bankruptcy in 2012 were just $26 per month short of meeting their expenses."

With more than 35,000 post offices, stations and branches located in every city and town in America, the Postal Service has the infrastructure to provide the desperately-needed services. 59% of Post Offices are located in “bank deserts” - ZIP codes where there are zero or only one bank(s).

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darvinasafo:

I see no lies.

darvinasafo:

I see no lies.

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eatcakey:

good morning

eatcakey:

good morning

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america-wakiewakie:

The ‘Blame Both Sides’ Syndrome and Other Hard Truths of the Palestinian Tragedy by Atif Choudhury | Huffington Post
When Dr. Mohammed Mossadegh went before the world at the United Nations Convention in 1951 to expose Britain’s colonialist domination of Iran, he boldly confronted his country’s imperialist oppressors:

"They [The British government] are trying "to persuade world opinion that the lamb has devoured the wolf."

International law affords special protection to vulnerable populations through Protocol I of the Geneva Convention by designating “armed conflicts in which peoples are fighting against colonial domination, alien occupation or racist regimes” as international conflicts. This principle does not excuse or exonerate atrocities perpetuated from the victimized population, as it holds both state and non-state actors accountable for their actions. Rather, recognition of the victimized population entails acknowledging their plight and understanding the root causes of their grievances — and seeking greater accountability from their oppressors.
Regardless of the true circumstances behind the casus belli of this latest phase, the fact of the matter is that this current round of conflict — like every round and phase of it — has a stark disparate impact on one community. This grossly disproportionate nature is not just confined to a vastly inflated body count on one side, but extends to the very essence of behavior. Sentiments like “it’s both sides fault” may be true in the strictest sense of the principle that it takes two parties to have a conflict, but in practice the gulf is stark.
One side routinely have their houses demolished, while another is building mansions in their place. One side are routinely expelled from their homes; the other side is adverse possessing them like it’s a monopoly game. One side has water use rationed down to the drop; the other draws upon the same water supply to support swimming pools and fountains in illegal settlements. One side routinely has pregnant women and/or their newly born children die while trying to get through a maze of checkpoints in order to get to their local hospital, the other has roads criss-crossing occupied territory exclusively for their own use. One side can be jailed, shot, and even killed for protesting, while the other can vandalize, harass, and assault with impunityand has the full resources of a sovereign state act as their personal security guards.
The list of disparities goes on and on, and again does not even take into account a stark reality of each and every phase of this six decade tragedy — that one sideroutinely loses far more of their sons, daughters, husbands, and wives than the other.
We can blame both sides all we want for the sake of maintaining “objectivity.” Yet one of these kids must belong in the timeout corner for far longer. In my world, that kid should be the bully. It’s up to you to decide who it is in yours.
Throughout history, BBSS [Blame Both Sides Syndrome] has long served oppressors and their defenders as politically correct pretense to deflect responsibility and blame. For far too many others, it is simply a convenient crutch to cop out of confrontation and remain apathetic. On the choice between supporting the oppressed or excusing and enabling their oppressors, I choose the former — as has countless citizens of conscience from all walks of life around the world. A growing number of Israelis and Palestinians, Jews and Muslims alike are embracing this reality and realizing that to be truly “pro-Israel” is to be anti-occupation and pro-two state solution, and to be “pro-Palestinian” as its essense to be pro-peace, pro-human rights, and to be a defender of the fundamental and universal right to self-determination.
I hope you will join us in doing the same. History is watching — and taking attendance.
(Read Full Text) (Photo Credit: Tijen Erol / Flickr)

america-wakiewakie:

The ‘Blame Both Sides’ Syndrome and Other Hard Truths of the Palestinian Tragedy by Atif Choudhury | Huffington Post

When Dr. Mohammed Mossadegh went before the world at the United Nations Convention in 1951 to expose Britain’s colonialist domination of Iran, he boldly confronted his country’s imperialist oppressors:

"They [The British government] are trying "to persuade world opinion that the lamb has devoured the wolf."

International law affords special protection to vulnerable populations through Protocol I of the Geneva Convention by designating “armed conflicts in which peoples are fighting against colonial domination, alien occupation or racist regimes” as international conflicts. This principle does not excuse or exonerate atrocities perpetuated from the victimized population, as it holds both state and non-state actors accountable for their actions. Rather, recognition of the victimized population entails acknowledging their plight and understanding the root causes of their grievances — and seeking greater accountability from their oppressors.

Regardless of the true circumstances behind the casus belli of this latest phase, the fact of the matter is that this current round of conflict — like every round and phase of it — has a stark disparate impact on one community. This grossly disproportionate nature is not just confined to a vastly inflated body count on one side, but extends to the very essence of behavior. Sentiments like “it’s both sides fault” may be true in the strictest sense of the principle that it takes two parties to have a conflict, but in practice the gulf is stark.

One side routinely have their houses demolished, while another is building mansions in their place. One side are routinely expelled from their homes; the other side is adverse possessing them like it’s a monopoly game. One side has water use rationed down to the drop; the other draws upon the same water supply to support swimming pools and fountains in illegal settlements. One side routinely has pregnant women and/or their newly born children die while trying to get through a maze of checkpoints in order to get to their local hospital, the other has roads criss-crossing occupied territory exclusively for their own use. One side can be jailed, shot, and even killed for protesting, while the other can vandalize, harass, and assault with impunityand has the full resources of a sovereign state act as their personal security guards.

The list of disparities goes on and on, and again does not even take into account a stark reality of each and every phase of this six decade tragedy — that one sideroutinely loses far more of their sons, daughters, husbands, and wives than the other.

We can blame both sides all we want for the sake of maintaining “objectivity.” Yet one of these kids must belong in the timeout corner for far longer. In my world, that kid should be the bully. It’s up to you to decide who it is in yours.

Throughout history, BBSS [Blame Both Sides Syndrome] has long served oppressors and their defenders as politically correct pretense to deflect responsibility and blame. For far too many others, it is simply a convenient crutch to cop out of confrontation and remain apathetic. On the choice between supporting the oppressed or excusing and enabling their oppressors, I choose the former — as has countless citizens of conscience from all walks of life around the world. A growing number of Israelis and Palestinians, Jews and Muslims alike are embracing this reality and realizing that to be truly “pro-Israel” is to be anti-occupation and pro-two state solution, and to be “pro-Palestinian” as its essense to be pro-peace, pro-human rights, and to be a defender of the fundamental and universal right to self-determination.

I hope you will join us in doing the same. History is watching — and taking attendance.

(Read Full Text) (Photo Credit: Tijen Erol / Flickr)

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